"…About our Spaghetti with prawns, whose eyes he had to cover with a serviette, because they made him sad."

- German politician and anti-war activist Jürgen Todenhöfer remembering his friendship with Michael Jackson, who he befriended in 2001, and described as being so sensitive that even the prawns they ate upset him

"After seeing a homeless man and woman arguing in the street, Michael told us to pull over. We pulled over to the curb and we just watched for a minute. Mr Jackson saw all the other cars passing by, and he asked, “Why isn’t anybody helping them? Why isn’t anybody stopping?” Then he said to Javon, “Call the woman over to the car.”

Javon rolled down the window, waved her over. When she got to the car, Mr Jackson rolled his window down just a little bit and said, “What’s your name?”

“Amanda,” she said.

They talked for a bit. He wanted to know her story. He asked her where she was from, where’s her family at. She said she used to be a dancer, a showgirl. Then I heard him reaching around in the backseat for something. I heard the sound of paper. He was pulling out money. He pulled out three one hundred dollar bills, gave them to her and said, “Here. Take This.”

She was floored. She was almost crying, saying, “Thank you, thank you, thank you.”

After he gave her the money, she backed up a few steps and I started to drive off. The guy that had been sitting near her got up, came over to her and tried to snatch the money away. She pulled back, but he kept trying to grab it from her and they started fighting again. She started yelling, “No! This is mine!”

Mr Jackson saw that and said, “No, no, no! Javon, stop the car. Pull back over.”

I pulled back over, he leaned back out of the window and called the man over this time, saying, “Don’t do that! Here, I’ve got something for you too.” He pulled out another three hundred dollars and gave it to the man. The lady started crying, like she’d been saved.

He told them to use the money for food. “Get something nourishing,” he said. “Don’t get any drugs.”

“No, sir!” they said. “No, sir!” They were both gushing with thank yous and God bless yous, when all of a sudden the man stopped and looked in the car window and said, “Are you Michael Jackson?”

“No. No, I’m not.”

As we were driving away, Mr Jackson asked us if there were a lot of people like that in the area, and after hearing that there were parts of Vegas where many homeless people lived, he asked us if we could drive there. “You want to get there tonight, sir? Tonight wouldn’t be a good time.” “No, no,” he said. “We can go another day. I just want to see.”

When he mentioned going there, I was hoping he’d forget about it. Sometimes when he made unusual requests, things I knew weren’t feasible or just weren’t a good idea, I’d wait a bit before following up, to see if he’d drop it. Sometimes he would. This time, he remembered. A couple of days later he came up to me and said, “When are we going to that side of town?”

“What side of town is that, sir?”

“Where the homeless people are.”

“We can go there today.”

“Okay, let’s go.”

We headed up Main street, and all of these people were out. You could hear in his voice that he was shocked that all of these people were homeless. “It’s just amazing,” he said. “This country is so rich and these people are poor and living on the street.”

He asked Javon to pull over, so we pulled over. I was a little antsy. I wasn’t cool pulling over in a nice car with all these people around. We sat there on the side of the road for a bit. Then Mr Jackson said, “I want to give them something.”

I thought he meant he wanted to get out of the car and I said, “I don’t think it’d be a good idea to go out there, sir.”

He said, “No, no, no. I’ll pass it out of the window.”

He cracked the window open and started waving people over. He had a fanny pack he was wearing. He opened it up and the whole thing was stuffed full of cash. They would come to the window and he would pass out a hundred dollar bill through the crack in the window to each one. One thing I noticed was that he was trying to catch the attention of the women. He wanted to make sure that they were the ones who got the money. He was like, “Come here. No, no, no. You. You come here.” A lot of men got money too, but I could hear him singling the women out of the crowd, calling them forward. People started lining up outside his window, like it was an ATM.

He gave away so much he ran out, and he got upset with himself. He was saying he should have brought more. We started to see another side of him, his compassion for others, and it was kind of amazing. There was no media out there, no cameras. There was only a crack in the window, so no one could tell it was him. It was just something he wanted to do.

After that, we went and handed out food to the homeless a number of times. He’d say, “Me and the kids are not going to eat this. Let’s take this down and give it away.” One time, he wanted the kids to come with us and see it, so we brought them along.

"

— Michael Jackson’s bodyguards, Bill Whitfield and Javon Beard, “Protecting Michael Jackson,” 2006-2009

harmonious-ambiance said: Bless this blog

:)

"Any time we went to the movies, he insisted on bringing spray butter and hot sauce for the popcorn. Had to have them. Would not start the movie without them. Sometimes we’d get to the theater and I’d be thinking that Javon had brought the spray butter and hot sauce, and Javon was thinking that I’d brought the spray butter and hot sauce. When we realized our mistake, one of us would have to run to the store to pick them up. Sometimes we’d have the managers hold up the movie until we could get the spray butter and hot sauce safely delivered.

I don’t care what anybody says about Michael Jackson trying to act like or turn himself into a white man. Anybody who insists on taking his own spray butter and hot sauce to a movie theater? That man is black, ghetto and hood."

— Bill Whitfield, MJ’s head of security 2006-2009

Rolling Stone rejecting to cover Jackson in 1979. 
At the time Don’t Stop Till You Get Enough and Rock With You had both recently been released as singles and had charted at number one. 

In 1979, Rolling Stone passed on a cover story about the singer, saying that it didn’t feel Jackson merited front cover status. “I’ve been told over and over again that black people on the covers of magazines don’t sell copies,” an exasperated Jackson told confidantes. “Just wait. Some day those magazines will come begging for an interview.” Jackson, of course, was right (Rolling Stone editor Jann Wenner actually sent a self-deprecatory letter acknowledging the oversight in 1984). And during the 1980s, at least, Jackson’s image seemed ubiquitous. Yet over the long haul, Jackson’s initial concern seems legitimate. As shown in the breakdown below, his appearances on the front cover of Rolling Stone, the United States’ most visible music publication, are far fewer than those of white artists: John Lennon: 30 Mick Jagger: 29 Paul McCartney: 26 Bob Dylan: 22 Bono: 22 Bruce Springsteen: 22 Madonna: 20 Britney Spears: 13 Michael Jackson: 8 (two came after he died; one featured Paul McCartney as well) Is it really possible that Michael Jackson, arguably the most influential artist of the 20th century, merited less than half the coverage of Bono, Bruce Springsteen, and Madonna?

Rolling Stone rejecting to cover Jackson in 1979.

At the time Don’t Stop Till You Get Enough and Rock With You had both recently been released as singles and had charted at number one.

In 1979, Rolling Stone passed on a cover story about the singer, saying that it didn’t feel Jackson merited front cover status. “I’ve been told over and over again that black people on the covers of magazines don’t sell copies,” an exasperated Jackson told confidantes. “Just wait. Some day those magazines will come begging for an interview.” Jackson, of course, was right (Rolling Stone editor Jann Wenner actually sent a self-deprecatory letter acknowledging the oversight in 1984). And during the 1980s, at least, Jackson’s image seemed ubiquitous. Yet over the long haul, Jackson’s initial concern seems legitimate. As shown in the breakdown below, his appearances on the front cover of Rolling Stone, the United States’ most visible music publication, are far fewer than those of white artists: John Lennon: 30 Mick Jagger: 29 Paul McCartney: 26 Bob Dylan: 22 Bono: 22 Bruce Springsteen: 22 Madonna: 20 Britney Spears: 13 Michael Jackson: 8 (two came after he died; one featured Paul McCartney as well) Is it really possible that Michael Jackson, arguably the most influential artist of the 20th century, merited less than half the coverage of Bono, Bruce Springsteen, and Madonna?

"I don’t consider myself religious in the sense of subscribing to a particular dogma. I would consider myself spiritual - in that I believe there is a domain of awareness in which we can experience our universality. I read all kinds of religious literature, because I believe there is truth in all of them."

— Michael Jackson, 1992

"When we were recording Imperial Bedroom, Bruce Thomas was in the next studio while I was doing a vocal. Paul McCartney was there, and Michael Jackson came in to do a vocal – everything was nice until somebody introduced Bruce as my bass player. And suddenly – there was a freeze-out. Michael Jackson was – “Oh, God, I don’t dig that guy… I don’t dig that guy.”

He had heard about it third hand, from Quincy Jones. Two guys I have a tremendous amount of admiration for. It depressed me that I wouldn’t be able to go up to him – I wouldn’t be able to go up and shake his hand, because he wouldn’t want to shake my hand. Or James Brown, for that matter. But what could I say? What could I say? How could you explain such a thing? But there is nothing I’d like more."

- Elvis Costello speaking about how Michael Jackson didn’t want to shake his hand after he’d heard about how Costello had used the N word to describe Ray Charles and James Brown

"Michael, during his visit to Gabon, was very impressed by the strength of the matriarchy there. My friend Philippe Djenno, perhaps the most diplomatic advisor of President Omar Bongo, explained to him, “For Africans, it’s your mother who tells you who you are. You inherit the property of your mother and of your uncle, and only secondarily that of your father. That’s what leads to matriarchy. Primacy is given to the mother but also to the entire family of the mother. So you know since you’re a child that it is less serious to be in conflict with your father than with your mother.”

Michael, who loved his mother, smiled at this. “It’s thanks to her,” he said, “That I knew about harmony and love."

— Gonzague Saint Bris talking about Michael Jackson’s visit to Gabon in 1992 (Michael’s will would end up reflecting a similar idea, leaving everything to only his mother and three children)

"In late May 2009 I was with Michael when he was leaving Arnold Klein’s office in Beverly Hills. The hype was building about the This Is It shows and there was a swarm of paparazzi outside the building. I was nervous about him being able to leave - the previous day had been a nasty experience both emotionally and physically: one photographer had shouted a question at him that was designed to be hurtful; then another had audibly banged Michael’s head with his oversized camera. It had been truly unpleasant and Michael had no reason to be in a good mood after that.

Today, a woman Michael didn’t know had gotten into the doctor’s office. She was older, and although I’d never seen her before it seems she had a habit of chasing away paparazzi whenever she saw them near celebrities in LA. When she met Michael, obviously for the first time, she was in tears, almost hysterical, ranting to him incoherently, and for no apparent reason kept saying “please” as if asking for help.

I’m a little ashamed to say, she was getting on my nerves. I could see he was tired and, after the events of the day before, I was worried about him exiting the building safely. I hadn’t even really spoken to him for that reason: I just wanted him to get out of there and be safe. And looking at this woman hugging him and ranting in his face, I wished he would say, “I’m sorry, I have to go,” put his own well being first and walk away.

Not Michael. He stood in complete peace, stooped a little to look this older lady in the eyes and said in that low, kind voice that I remember too clearly, “Tell me what you need. What is it you need? How can I help you?” Calmly, slowly, as if trying to instil her with some of his equilibrium. And still she couldn’t answer. She was just rambling because she couldn’t believe that she’d really met Michael Jackson, who most people saw as an untouchable icon; the greatest entertainer of all time, who had broken so many boundaries in a stellar career over the past four decades. She couldn’t believe that this man, who symbolized so much to her, had hugged her when she’d asked for a hug. And when she pleaded aimlessly for something she couldn’t even identify, he gave her everything a person could ask for. He treated her with love, dignity and respect. He lowered his head, gave her his time and offered of himself, even though he had no idea who this hysterical person was or what she wanted.

He hadn’t dismissed her. He hadn’t thought of himself or how badly his bodyguards needed to get him out of that building and away from the throng of photographers.

That was Michael."

— Maria Crawford on Michael Jackson, one month before he passed away


Note from Michael Jackson’s daughter found in his room after his passing, June 25th 2009. 
19 July 2012 Paris Jacksoη#ThingsIWontForget the goodbye hug he gave me before he left for rehearsal.. last time i saw him

Note from Michael Jackson’s daughter found in his room after his passing, June 25th 2009.

19 July 2012 Paris Jacksoη
#ThingsIWontForget the goodbye hug he gave me before he left for rehearsal.. last time i saw him


Stevie Wonder taking a photo of Michael Jackson at the Motown Museum.

Stevie Wonder taking a photo of Michael Jackson at the Motown Museum.

"When Michael [Jackson] had an audience with Pope Paul, he brought Seth Riggs his vocal coach along with him. While they were waiting to meet with his holiness in the outer chamber, a fly came into the room. It skillfully buzzed freely around them with a childlike freedom and Seth became so annoyed that he couldn’t take it anymore and killed it on the spot. With tears in his eyes Michael asked, “Why did you do that?!” Seth retorted, “It was just buzzing around here, getting on my nerves!” Michael answered him like a Zen master and said, “He was enjoying his freedom and living his life and you ended it!” From that day forward Seth understood and he took on a deeper appreciation for all life because of Michael’s compassion for a fly."

— Howard McCrary, of the McCrary’s family singers

"My friend had this middle aged woman who kept coming in to see This Is It while it was playing. She would be there at almost every showing during the week. So my friend finally went up and asked her if she was a big fan or what.

Turns out, she had a brain tumor and it wasn’t operable and her doctor had told her that she would likely be blind by the end of that year. So my friend asked her about her relationship with MJ, and she was like, “I’m so glad you asked! You must all think I’m nuts for coming in to see this film everyday. I’m not just here to see him perform, it’s because I met him and I miss him.”

Basically, she said she was a single mother with five children in the late 80s/90s and Michael was her favorite musician. She’d written him a fan letter telling him how much she loved him and explained how much he had helped her feel better even though she wasn’t getting better. She would randomly write him and update him on how she was doing, her family, just like having someone to talk to even if he didn’t respond, and then a few months later she received a letter back from MJ basically saying how much he appreciated her writing/loved her too/and how his thoughts were with her. Then about another 6 months later she received a call from the Jackson camp asking her permission for a visit from Michael. Obviously she said yes, and about a week later she was washing dishes at her home when there was knocking at her door. It startled her and she ran to the front door, and it was Michael asking her to let him in quickly before anyone could see him. They sat and talked for a bit and then there was another knock at the door and it was a delivery guy with a new fridge and groceries for this woman, that MJ had randomly bought for her beforehand. This woman was basically in tears thanking him at this point (and talking about it again), and she would always send him messages and occasionally hear back from him after that.

So this woman explained she was likely going to be blind by the end of the year, but before she did, she wanted to memorize him as he was so she could remember him always because of how much he’d meant to her and her family.

True story. So what may seem crazy to others, may be less crazy in reality. You never know what stories people have."

— Posted by bluepinkmuffin ; Reddit

Pharrell Williams on his phone call with Michael Jackson (x)

(Source: bluemoonwalker)